Natural Sciences Courses

Athletic Training

AT 220. Safety and Supervision (2)
The study, practice, and application of the standards and accepted principles in the American National Red Cross standard first aid and CPR for professional rescuers. A unit on blood-borne pathogens will also be included in this course. (Students who have current certification in any of these areas may submit them for consideration toward meeting the requirements of this course.)

AT 222. Introduction to Athletic Training (2)
Designed to provide the student with an introduction to the knowledge and skills of prevention, care, and treatment of common athletic injuries. Co-requisite: 271 Prerequisites: Admission to the program; BIO 122, 134. Fall

AT 223. General Medical Conditions/Pharmacology (3)
Designed to enhance the student’s knowledge of general medical conditions such as skin disorders, internal medicine, common diseases, etc. The course will also discuss the basic principles of pharmacology as it relates to the profession of athletic training. Prerequisites: Admission to the program; HEA 220, AT 222, AT 271. Spring

AT 271. Athletic Training Practicum I (2)
Designed to enhance the athletic training students knowledge of theory and practical application through sophomore level competencies and clinical hours. Co-requisite: AT 222. Prerequisites: Admission to the program; BIO 122, 134. Fall.

AT 272. Athletic Training Practicum II (2)
Designed to further enhance the athletic training students knowledge of theory and practical application through sophomore level competencies and clinical hours. Co-requisite AT 325. Prerequisites: Admission to the program. AT 222, 271, HEA 220. Spring.

AT 323. Evaluation and Treatment of Athletic Injuries I (3)
Designed to enhance the athletic training students knowledge of clinical evaluation and treatment of cranial, facial, cervical, temporomandibular joint, and upper extremity injuries associated with physical activity. Co-requisite: AT 371. Perquisites: AT 222, 271, 272, 325. Fall.

AT 325. Evaluation and Treatment of Athletic Injuries II (3)
Designed to enhance the athletic training students knowledge of clinical evaluation and treatment of thoracic, abdominal, lumbar spine, and lower extremity injuries associated with physical activity.
Co-requisite: AT 272. Prerequisites: AT 222, 271. Spring.

AT 327, 328. Special Topics (1-3)
Options for students to study, according to their interests, a variety of topics not covered in regular courses. To be announced by the department.

AT 340. Therapeutic Modalities (3)
Designed to enhance the athletic training students knowledge in the use of various modalities and their relationship to the treatment of athletic injuries associated with. Prerequisites: AT 222, 223, 271, 325, 272. Fall.

AT 341. Therapeutic Exercise (3)
Designed to enhance the athletic training students knowledge in the use of various strategies and equipment and their relationship to the rehabilitation of athletic injuries associated with physical activity. Co-requisite AT 372. Prerequisites: AT 222, 223, 271, 272, 325, 323, 340, 371. Spring.

AT 371. Athletic Training Practicum III (2)
Designed to enhance the athletic training students knowledge of theory and practical application through junior level competencies and clinical hours. Co-requisite: 323. Prerequisites: AT 222, 223, 325, 340, 271, 272. Fall.

AT 372. Athletic Training Practicum IV (2)
Designed to further enhance the athletic training students knowledge of theory and practical application through junior level competencies and clinical hours. Co-requisite: 341. Prerequisites: AT 222, 223, 271, 272, 323, 325, 371. Spring.

AT 415. Administration of Athletic Training (3)
Designed to aid the student in developing a knowledge of principles, organization, and administration of athletic training programs. Prepares the student for clinical experiences involving prevention, evaluation, care, and rehabilitation of injuries associated with physical activity. Co-requisite: AT 471. Prerequisites: AT 222, 223, 271, 272, 323, 325, 340, 341, 371, 372. Fall.

AT 427. Senior Seminar (2)
Designed to prepare students to take the NATA-BOC certification examination and further their knowledge in athletic training. Co-requisite: AT 472. Prerequisites: AT 222, 223, 271, 272, 323, 325, 340, 341, 371, 372. 415, 471. Spring.

AT 457, 458. Directed Readings (1-3)
Independent readings directed by members of the athletic training faculty members. Materials may be obtained from the department chair or program director.

AT 460. Independent Study (1-3)
An opportunity for the outstanding student to pursue professional interest areas in some degree of depth. Library research in the form of an undergraduate thesis will be required. Materials may be obtained from the department chair or program director.

AT 471. Athletic Training Practicum V (2)
Designed to enhance the athletic training students knowledge of theory and practical application through senior level competencies and clinical hours. Co-requisite: 415 AT 415. Prerequisites: AT 222, 223, 271, 272, 323, 325, 340, 341, 371. Fall.

AT 472. Athletic Training Practicum VI (2)
Designed to further enhance the athletic training student’s knowledge of theory and practical application through senior level competencies and clinical hours. Co-requisite: AT 427. Prerequisites: AT 222, 223, 271, 272, 323, 325, 340, 341, 371, 372, 415, 471. Spring.

Biology

BIO 113. Introduction to Organismal Biology (4)
Basic morphology, physiology, and diversity of living organisms. Laboratory. Fall and Spring.

BIO 114. Introduction to Ecology and Evolution (4)
Basic ecology and evolution of populations, communities, and ecosystems. Laboratory. Fall and Spring.

BIO 115. Introduction to Cellular Biology and Genetics (4)
An introduction to cellular structure and function including cell reproduction and basic genetics. Laboratory. No prerequisites, but an elementary knowledge of chemistry helpful. This course meets the NS Connector requirement. Fall and Spring.

BIO 122. Medical Terminology (3)
Etymology of the words and terms used in medicine and in the biological sciences. Emphasizes objective test taking. Every semester.

BIO 134, 135. Human Anatomy and Physiology (4, 4)
An integrated study of the structure and function of the human body systems. Lecture and laboratory sessions. Spring and summer.

BIO 213. Human Biology (4)
Selected topics from cellular biology, genetics, microbiology, evolution, and ecology emphasizing the relationship between modern biology and the treatment of human disorders. Laboratory. Prerequisite: NS 111 or any one of BIO 113, BIO 114, or BIO 115.

BIO 214. Natural History of the Southern Appalachians (4)
The physical geography, climate, and biota of the Southern Highlands with emphasis on the distribution of living organisms in relationship to the environment. Laboratory.

BIO 215. Cellular and Molecular Biology (4)
The study of the molecular aspects of cellular structure and function. Laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 115; CHM 113, 114.

BIO 216. Genetics (4)
An integrated study of classical genetics and developments in molecular genetics. Laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 115; CHM 113, 114.

BIO 226. Nutrition (3)
The biological principles of human nutrition. Prerequisite: CHM 113 or consent of instructor.

BIO 231. Comparative Chordate Anatomy (4)
A comparative study of the origin, relationships, and functional morphology of chordates. Laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 113, 114.

BIO 243. Biology of Non-vascular Plants (4)
Comparative morphology, phylogeny, physiology, and biochemistry of algae, liverworts, and mosses. Laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 113.

BIO 244. Biology of Vascular Plants (4)
Comparative anatomy and morphology, life histories, and economic contributions of the major groups of vascular plants. Laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 113.

BIO 250. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (4)
An introduction to the theory and practice of analysis of spatial information using the technology of geographic information systems (GIS). There is an emphasis on hands-on learning using GIS software, hard copy maps, and data from several disciplines. Laboratory. Prerequisites: MTH 113 or MTH 115, ED 200 or BA 202, or permission of instructor.

BIO 261. Internship (1-4)
An initial outside-the-classroom experience enabling students to explore new areas or to supplement regular courses. Credit awarded upon successful completion of the internship as described in the departmentally approved proposal. May be repeated only in unusual circumstances. Every semester.

BIO 325. Biotechnology (4)
Purification, cutting, splicing, transfer, and detection of DNA. Tissue culture of living material included. Laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 111, 115; CHM 113, 114.

BIO 327-328-329. Special Topics (1-4)
Options for students to study, according to their interests, a variety of topics not covered in regular courses. Previous topics have included cytogenetics, developmental biology, entomology, invertebrate zoology, mammalogy, ornithology, parasitology, vertebrate embryology. Future topics to be announced by the department. Prerequisites: BIO 113, 114.

BIO 334. Comparative Animal Behavior (3)
The evolution, development, and ecology of animal behavior. Prerequisites: BIO 114 and PSY 111. Offered on demand.

BIO 336. Microbiology (4)
The microscopic forms: viruses, rickettsias, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa, and their relationship to man. Laboratory emphasis on the isolation, cultivation, identification, physiology, and methods of bacteria control. Prerequisites: BIO 115; CHM 113, 114.

BIO 337. Immunology (4)
Study of the immune system. Laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 215. Recommended: BIO 336.

BIO 339. Plant and Animal Physiology (4)
Selected topics in the physiology of vascular plants and vertebrates. Laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 113, 115.

BIO 341. Vertebrate Histology (4)
Histological principles and microscopic characteristics of cells, tissues, organs, and systems. Laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 113, 115.

BIO 346. Plant Taxonomy (4)
The identification and classification of vascular plants. Laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 113, 114.

BIO 347. Population and Community Ecology (4)
Ecological principles and concepts; the dynamics of the interactions between organisms and their environment; and population, community, and ecosystem interrelationships. Laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 113, 114; 200 or 300-level organismal course; MTH 116 or permission of instructor.

BIO 348. Vertebrate Taxonomy and Natural History (4)
The life histories, behavior, distribution, ecology, and identification of vertebrates with field studies in local environments. Laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 113, 114.

BIO 350. Research Methods in Biology (2)
Overview of the process of scientific research and reporting. Prepares student for initiating an original research project for a senior thesis. Content includes exposure to primary literature, experimental design, approaches to data analysis, and reporting on findings. Career and graduate study options will be explored. Prerequisites: BIO 113, 114, 115; CHM 113, 114; MTH 115, 116. Spring.

BIO 412. Evolution (4)
History of the evolution concept, mechanisms of evolution, and the history of life. Laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 113, 114, 115; MTH 116.

BIO 438. Biochemistry (4)
The chemistry of the carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins; their role in metabolism. Laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 215; CHM 113, 114.

BIO 450. Biology Senior Seminar (1)
Required of biology program seniors. Preparing and delivering reports on scientific studies. Students will produce written and oral reports on findings of original research. Prerequisites: BIO 350. Spring.

BIO 457. Directed Readings (1-4)
Intensive reading in areas of special interest to the student or centered around a specific topic for advanced work or research purposes. The student must have the approval of the instructor and the department chair. Application must be made the semester before enrollment. Offered each semester.

BIO 460. Independent Study (1-4)
A directed program of laboratory and/or field research. The student must have the approval of the instructor, department chair, and appropriate college faculty committee. Application must be made the semester before enrollment. Prerequisites: BIO 350; MTH 116. Offered each semester.

BIO 461. Internship (1-8)
A student/agency-originated and departmentally approved learning experience which enables students to apply previously attained knowledge and skills. May be repeated for a total of 8 semester hours of credit. Offered each semester.

Chemistry

CHM 113, 114. General Chemistry I, II 4, 4
The fundamental laws and theories of chemistry with correlated laboratory experiments. CHM 114 cannot be taken without credit for CHM 113. Meets the Natural Science Connector requirement.

CHM 215. Introductory Descriptive Chemistry 4
Coordination compounds, solid state, elementary thermodynamics, and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHM 114.

CHM 227. Intro to Quantitative Analysis 4
Fundamental laws related to analytical procedures: gravimetric, volumetric, and instrumental techniques are used in the laboratory. Prerequisite: CHM 114.

CHM 235. Environmental Chemistry 4
The chemistry of the atmosphere, soil, and water, with emphasis on how pollution, toxic chemicals, and energy production affect the environment. Laboratory emphasis on environmental monitoring and testing techniques. Prerequisite: CHM 114.

CHM 261. Internship 1–4
An initial outside-the-classroom experience enabling students to explore new areas or to supplement regular courses. Department approval required.

CHM 327. Special Topics 2–4
The opportunity to study contemporary topics or topics not typically covered in the Chemistry major curriculum. Offered at the discretion of the department to match student requests or interests. Prerequisites: CHM 113, CHM 114.

CHM 335, 336. Organic Chemistry 4, 4
The structure, mechanism, synthesis, and reactions of organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHM 114. CHM 336 cannot be taken without credit for CHM 335.

CHM 350. Research Methods in Chemistry 2
Overview of the process of scientific research and reporting. Prepares student for initiating an original research project for a senior thesis. Content includes exposure to primary literature, experimental design, approaches to data analysis, and reporting on findings. Career and graduate study options will be explored. Prerequisites: CHM 113, 114, 335; MTH 115, 116. Spring semester.

CHM 438. Introductory Biochemistry 4
The chemistry of the carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, and their role in metabolism. Prerequisite: CHM 335. This course may count as either chemistry or biology, but not both.

CHM 441, 442. Physical Chemistry 4, 4
A mathematical approach to the laws and principles of chemistry. CHM 442 cannot be taken without credit for CHM 441. Prerequisites: CHM 215, 227, 336 and MTH 120.

CHM 450. Senior Seminar Presentation 1
Required of chemistry program seniors. Preparing and delivering reports on scientific studies. Students will produce written and oral reports on findings of original research. Prerequisites: CHM 350. Spring semester.

CHM 457, 458. Directed Readings 2–4
Selected readings directed by department faculty in the areas of analytical, biological, organic, and physical chemistry. Open to juniors and seniors.

CHM 460. Independent Study 4
Independent in-depth investigation, reading, and research in a professional area of interest. Department approval required. Open to junior or senior chemistry majors. Only one course of independent study may be counted toward the major.

CHM 461. Internship 4
A student/agency-originated and departmentally approved field-learning experience which enables students to apply previously attained knowledge and skills. A maximum of four semester hours may be used toward the major.

Environmental Studies

ES 301. Environmental Studies Practicum 2–3
An individual project designed by the student in consultation with the Environmental Studies coordinator addressing a current environmental issue.

Health

HEA 220. Safety and Supervision 2
The study, practice, and application of the standards and accepted principles in the American National Red Cross standard first aid and CPR for professional rescuers. A unit on blood-borne pathogens will also be included in this course. (Students who have current certification in any of these areas may submit them for consideration toward meeting the requirements of this course.)

HEA 221. First Aid, CPR/PR & Sports Injuries 3
This course is designed to provide the student with a basic background in the science and art of prevention, evaluation and treatment of basic sports injuries, and how to respond in certain emergency situations. Upon completion of the course the student will be certified by the American Red Cross in CPR/PR, AED, Basic First Aid and PDT. Fulfills one of the requirements for the physical education major.

HEA 233. Health Education 3
The study of current health issues and methods of teaching health education at the elementary, middle, and secondary school level. Designed specifically for teacher preparation and athletic training majors, it will include study of the consolidated School Health Program, health education programs and curriculum, Personnel and Community Health issues and methodology and materials for instruction. It will include guest speakers from the various CSHP components and/or 3-8 visits to various health agencies and schools. Sophomore status or above. Prerequisites: ED 205, PE 221.

HEA 240. Personal Trainer 3
This course is designed to develop individuals into knowledgeable and competent practitioners in the fitness industry. Students will build an advanced level of knowledge and comprehension about health and fitness, and how to apply that knowledge in the fitness industry.

HEA 241. Exercise & Nutrition Prescription & Promotion 3
This course is designed to educate the student in the design, implementation and promotion of a well rounded “fitness/wellness” program. The course includes but is not limited to the design and implementation of a cardiovascular program, muscular strength and endurance program, flexibility program, nutrition program and stress management program. Students will design the programs, design marketing promotions for the programs and implement the programs on a small scale. Prerequisite: HEA 240.

HEA 242. Lifestyle Behavior Management 3
This course provides students with an understanding of skills, principles and techniques used in a program for the attainment of behavior modification in relation to diet, physical activity, exercise and lifestyle management.

HEA 332. Adapted Physical Education 3
Designed for instructing the handicapped individual and for providing the prospective teacher with leadership, competencies, and a diversified program of developmental activities, games, sports, gymnastics, and dance suited to the interests, capacities, and limitations of students with disabilities which may prevent their engaging in the activities of the general physical education program. Experiences include observations of and practical experiences with exceptional students. Visits to various programs/schools will be required. Prerequisites: ED 205, HEA 233, PE 221 or permission of instructor.

Natural Science

NS 111. Introduction to Biological Sciences 4
Selected topics from the biological sciences emphasizing important factual information, methods, scientific principles, and their application. Laboratory. Meets the Natural Science Connector requirement.

NS 112. Introduction to Environmental Science 4
Principles of the environmental systems and human effects of the environment. Includes functioning of natural ecosystems as well as causes, consequences, and solutions to current environmental problems. Meets the Natural Science Connector requirement.

NS 113. Introduction to Physical Sciences 4
The fundamental principles of astronomy, chemistry, geology, and physics. Laboratory. Meets the Natural Science Connector requirement.

NS 114. Introduction to Meteorology and Weather Forecasting 4
Composition and structure of the atmosphere; jet streams, air masses, fronts, and precipitation; greenhouse effect and climate change; hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, and drought; numerical weather prediction. Students prepare and present weather forecasts using real-time weather data. Laboratory. Meets the Natural Science Connector requirement.